Scanning Your Film Negatives vs. Prints: An Interesting Comparison

They were definitely taken with a classic manual camera, though. This is a set of 18 Kodachrome slides that I found recently in a Kodak slide carousel that was owned by my mother who died more than 20 years ago. From the styles of hair, clothes, and cars, I would guess they date from around , give or take a few years. I assume they had some significance to my mom; presumably she knew the people at the time, and it’s even possible that she took the pictures, though there’s no proof of that. Anyway, I thought folks around here might be interested; if nothing else, there are a couple of attractive young women in the set. Lacking a serious scanner capable of producing good results from slides, I simply placed the slides on a light box on a copy stand and rephotographed them using a Canon 5D Mark II and a Tokina mm macro lens. I have made no effort to clean up scratches or dirt, though I have done all the things I usually do with raw files — adjust color balance, contrast, exposure, apply a little RL deconvolution for sharpening, and so on. The results are pretty decent, though I expect a dedicated film scanner could do better. In keeping with PN’s policy against posting photos you didn’t take yourself, I’ll just give a link to my gallery.

Nasty and banal: even Kate Winslet can’t save Woody Allen’s Wonder Wheel

Slide mounted by the Realist mounting service. Slide mounted in glass and sealed with tape. Seton Rochwite was a camera hobbyist who began designing and building his own stereo cameras in

Colour Slides, approx of South African Steam, of which approx taken – and the rest taken on the latter part of the Namaqualander Railtour in September and first part of the Drakensburg Farewell Railtour in July

Scanning Your Film Negatives vs. Do you want to scan your original camera negatives, or the prints made from them? We got what we wanted when took them to the Photo Bug or the Photo Hut or the drug store down the street — a stack of photos to stick in our photo albums. So, I guess a lot of us probably felt safe tossing out the film negatives. I sent them all different sized prints, color and black and white, some with borders and some with rounded corners, some with scratches, and many that needed lots of color correction.

In addition to the prints, I also sent some negatives and slides. When I was going through all the images when I got them back — which was really cool by the way! This was the first time I had ever sent photos to a scanning service. When I was going through them, I noticed something really interesting. I had sent them the print as well as the original film negative to a photo I took a long time ago when I was a boy.

I was looking at the negative version of the photo and noticed there was more of the trees showing on both the left and right side of the image than there has always been in the print I had made. It almost seemed like an entirely different photo because the viewpoint looks like I took about 6 big steps backwards in order to get a wider shot! Image Cropping I always knew there was more information image detail stored in the negatives, but until now, I had never seen any real proof that scanning the negatives might yield a lot more of the actual image that had been cropped out when it was originally printed.

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His love of antiques began in the flea markets, tag sales, and antique shops of his native Westchester County, New York, appreciating the beauty and simplicity of 18th century English silver. How did you get your start in the auction world? He taught me what to look for, and how to haggle! To bust the vast majority of repros all you need to do is look closely.

Ask yourself if there a reason the work looks suspicious? Maybe the colors look a little off, like an old Kodachrome slide or that faded poster that used to hang in your dorm room?

civil aircraft slide- dh comet c.2 xk – – original SLIDE MOUNTS ARE NOTED WITH FULL DETAILS OF SUBJECT ie. Make, Model, Ser no.,Location, Operator & date.

The links you provided are fantastic, but I was wondering if it was possible to find Kodachrome mounted in cardboard or plastic mounts that DID NOT have the word “Kodachrome” on them? For example, I’m working on scanning some older family slides from the 50’s and 60’s. One box has a graphic on the lid that says “Brown Photo”, with the word “Slides” printed to the right. Probably the name of the local camera store, I would assume. The slides inside are dated “Nov 66” on one side, and the simple text “Color Transparency” and “This Side Towards Screen” on the other.

Nowhere does it say Kodachrome – but the film clearly has the raised relief topography of Kodachrome, and it certainly visually appears to be Kodachrome. I’m reluctant to slit the mount and remove the film to make sure, because they were entrusted to me and I guess it really isn’t absolutely necessary to know for sure. Just my own curiosity. I have some slides of my own that I shot in the early ‘s that are in plastic mounts that I just KNOW are Kodachrome, but there is no indication anywhere on these mounts either.

Kodachrome

September Kodachrome II – Film for color slides Kodachrome was the first color film that used a subtractive color method to be successfully mass-marketed. Previous materials, such as Autochrome and Dufaycolor , had used the additive screenplate methods. Until its discontinuation, Kodachrome was the oldest surviving brand of color film. Kodachrome is appreciated in the archival and professional market for its dark-storage longevity.

Maybe the colors look a little off, like an old Kodachrome slide or that faded poster that used to hang in your dorm room? Maybe the texture of the surface seems wrong; it looks like the paint is applied with heavy impasto (meaning thick, loose, brushstrokes) but the surface is flat as a pancake?

The archive resides there alongside his studio collection, which includes physical works. Goldsworthy has also built a number of sculptures within the grounds, typically when ‘testing out’ possible ideas for commissions. Those sculptures are permanently sited. Previously, his studio was located at The Granary, also in Penpont. The Granary dates to the 18th century, and aside from its historic use as a Mill, it has in recent years, also accommodated a furniture workshop.

Goldsworthy purchased the building in , when he was living and working in Langholm in Southwest Dumfriesshire. It was his first studio, and provided the primary motivation for Goldsworthy’s move to Penpont at that time. Please note, Goldsworthy’s archive and studio are not open to the public, apart from occasional open studio days. Back to top Contents Goldsworthy’s archive comprises personal papers, photographic, written and AV documentation, as well as artefacts dating from onwards.

This material pertains to his ephemeral work, his residencies and projects, his commissions, and his temporary exhibitions. Back to top Slide Index The largest component of Goldsworthy’s archive is his collection of slides and transparencies, which he has organised according to the three strands of his practice:

Nasty and banal: even Kate Winslet can’t save Woody Allen’s Wonder Wheel

Admin Serious Dating A photo slide is a specially mounted individual transparency intended for projection onto a screen using a slide projector. This allows the photograph to be viewed by a large audience at once. The most common form is the 35 mm slide, placed inside a cardboard or plastic shell for projection. Early slide projectors used a sliding mechanism to manually pull the transparency out of the side of the machine, where it could be replaced by the next image, and it is from this that we get the name “slide”.

All are original Kodak processed Kodachrome slides in original mounts except as noted! 1. Cab Car with long distance passenger train Williams Bay, WI 12/2/ John Eagan, Sr.

The Kodachrome Project A wonderful and lasting body of photography that speaks not only of the Kodachrome era, but what can be done to bridge it with future ones, for there will never be another Kodachrome. Kodak wants to celebrate the rich history of this storied film. Feel free to share the fondest memories of Kodachrome. Information on how long a Kodachrome slide should be used in a projector, or what are the storage conditions to preserve the colors from fading. Examples of original Kodachrome slides from until Please join our voyage of discovery over 70 years of history of both aviation photography and Kodachrome.

Kodak introduced a projector for them in February , and Kodak glass slide mounts were introduced in April Pressboard mounts were announced on February as being standard on all processing effective April 1, Initially, Kodak sold the film and processing together and the customer paid for both when they bought the film. After the decision, Kodachrome was sold as film and processing could be done by independent laboratories or by Kodak.

Care, Handling, and Storage of Photographs

It seems that the originals will not put in an appearance in Mexico City. Instead, those who shell out their cash, and any media who show up, will be treated to copies. But one of the critical factors is the date of the film stock from which the slides were taken and you can have as much documentation as you want, but the question will remain, is that documentation accurate. The real thing needs to be seen.

Lockheed FDJ Starfighter – – JASDF – Original Kodachrome Slide All mounts may have written or stamped information such as serial number, squadron code, date taken, location, etc. £

Then, plug the converter into any free USB port on your computer, or into a wall outlet. Then, just turn on your converter, and you’re ready to start scanning your slides and negatives! It’s time to turn your old photos and slides into digital format! Then, press the “Scan” button and your digital photo will be saved onto the included memory card. Then, you’ll be able to transfer the photos to your computer.

You can also simply remove the memory card from your converter and insert into a card reader on your computer.

Kodachrome

September Kodachrome II – Film for color slides Kodachrome was the first color film that used a subtractive color method to be successfully mass-marketed. Previous materials, such as Autochrome and Dufaycolor , had used the additive screenplate methods. Until its discontinuation, Kodachrome was the oldest surviving brand of color film. Kodachrome is appreciated in the archival and professional market for its dark-storage longevity.

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This chart shows the various styles of graphics printed on the back sides of 35MM Kodachrome slides processed by Kodak until about the year Large dates appearing in center of mounts specify the years during which these mounts were used in production by Kodak. This should help collectors date slides if for some reason the dates printed on slides have faded or have been otherwise obliterated.

The “red-border greymounts” were usually not dated by Kodak. Slide mounts used by Kodak to mount Ektachrome slides processed by Kodak pretty much parallel the dates and styles illustrated in the chart, with blue replacing the red. Kodachromes and Ektachromes processed by the many independent processors over the years were usually mounted in each processor’s own mounts with different graphics.

Sometime in the mid ‘s, Kodak added the words “Processed by Kodak” to their slide mounts as they were forced to allow more independent labs to process Kodachrome, yet wanted to identify Kodachrome processed by Kodak for use as a marketing tool, and for trade dress protection. Kodachrome II was a “new improved film” circa and warranted special graphics on mounts used while this excellent film was sold. KII was soon superceded by newer films which many professionals didn’t like as much because of increased contrast and other factors.

In the mount revisions, the famous “corner curl” trade dress began to shrink. Then, in , Kodak introduced a newly designed square corp- orate logo, which quickly made its way onto the mounts. The “curled corner trade dress was dropped, as it began to seem a bit anachronistic on modern products. In , the square corporate logo began to undergo many variations because of business agreements, and designs surfaced that more or less integrated the symbol within other graphic shapes.

Making a Wet Mount for Microscopy